GF Egg-in-a-Hole

GF Egg-in-a-Hole

'Tis the season for all things baked, warm and cozy!

It's no secret that I am obsessed with roasted vegetables this time of the year {well honestly, all year long}, especially winter squashes. There are so many varieties and I am constantly on the hunt to try something new. This year in particular I have kept butternut and delicata squash on rotation during my meal preps as well as another personal fave...acorn squash!

Acorn squash is SO versatile! If you follow me over on Instagram, and have caught any of my 'my stories', you've probably seen that acorn squash regularly makes an appearance during lunch time. It's so easy to roast up a whole acorn squash and slice or mash what ya want to add some much needed clean carbs to your lunch game. But...don't be fooled, acorn squash isn't just a side dish. It can also be the star of the show, even during breakfast!

I first came across this idea of using acorn squash with eggs from the lovely Blair, of @banacewithb, after seeing how simple this quick breakfast could be I was instantly hooked. Low carb, gluten-free and full of seasonal flavor.

acorn squash egg.PNG

Before you get started, let's talk squash prep. When I know that I want to make this egg-in-a-hole spin-off, I will roast my acorn squash whole, ahead of time.

I start by washing the entire squash in some warm water. This is just to get off any dirt that may have clung on because the skin, if cooked enough, is perfectly edile so make sure it's clean! Next I cut the top of the squash off, about a good 1/2 an inch or so. This will remove any left over stem and give you space to carve out the seeds. Cut a wide hole into the top of the acorn squash flesh; just like you would if you were to gut out a pumpkin before carving. You don't have to cut too deep before you'll see the seeds exposed. I take a large kitchen spoon and use that to remove the seeds and scrape the inside of the squash - you can also save and roast these like you would pumpkin seeds too! Once the squash is fully cleaned and de-seeded, it's time to roast. I like to spray a small amount of olive oil on the inside and season with a little sea salt and cracked black pepper. From there I will turn the squash upside down and begin roasting with the exposed flesh side down at 400 degrees. Depending upon size this can take anywhere from 35-50 minutes. I check after about 25 minutes and rotate the squash as needed. Let it cool completely before storing it in an airtight container. 

Gluten-Free Baked Egg + Acorn Squash

  • 1 thick ring* of pre-roasted acorn squash {*see above for roasting directions; having the whole squash roasted intact makes it easy to slice off a ring or two for baked eggs!}
  • 1 large egg
  • Seasonings of your choice: sea salt, cracked black pepper, thyme, paprika, parsley

To prepare your baked egg-in-a-hole cut off a nice thick ring of your pre-roasted acorn squash; the thicker the better, so you'll have room for that egg to nestle in nicely. You can choose to leave the skin on, or if you roasted it well, it should peel right off on its own. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and give it a quick spray with olive oil before placing your squash ring down. Then just simply crack an egg inside the whole and season to your liking! Bake at 425 for about 10-15 miutes, or until the egg reaches your desired consistency. I tend to go with 10 minutes because I like a runny yolk! If you have it handy, sprinkle on a little fresh chopped parlsey and enjoy!

Seriously so simple and such a nice change from the norm. Give this spin on the classic egg-in-a-hole a try next time you feel like you're in a breakfast rut!

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